Scott Galloway on the break up of big tech – notes and video from DLD18

I’ve been mostly travelling since the DLD conference, so just catching up on my notes and reflections now. Scott Galloway was one of the people I was really keen to see speak in Munich. His recent book The Four was one of my best reads of 2017 – I bought several copies for our office…… Continue reading Scott Galloway on the break up of big tech – notes and video from DLD18

Taking back the future – DLD18 notes from Day One

I’ve already posted about Paul Daugherty of Accenture’s session on AI – the following are some themes and notes I picked up through the rest of Sunday at DLD 18 Munich.  Yesterday at DLD began with Facebook’s VP Communications and Public Policy, Elliot Schrage, defending the company’s critics. What is Facebook going to do about…… Continue reading Taking back the future – DLD18 notes from Day One

Reckitt’s strategic approach to Facebook marketing

Reckitt Benckheiser is taking social media seriously enough to start joint business planning with Facebook, according to AdAge: Reckitt Benckiser, like other packaged-goods players, has long done business planning with major retailers such as Walmart and Target, where it maps out long-term promotional products and marketing programs. Now, RB is applying the concept to Facebook.…… Continue reading Reckitt’s strategic approach to Facebook marketing

Slow-mo social: Friction and frictionless sharing

Interesting train of thought set in motion by an excellent blog post from Chris Thorpe. He makes a case for “frictionless sharing” (stuff you read or see or listen to being shared automatically with your social network) as promoted by Facebook, being “noisy and for robots” while “declarative frictionfull sharing” (deciding to share things and putting…… Continue reading Slow-mo social: Friction and frictionless sharing

On revolutions: two blog posts that stopped me in my tracks

Two blog posts – one notes for a Newsnight feature that never got made, the other an academic paper – made a deep impression on me when I read them last week, and have stayed with me since. I’ve recommended them on Twitter and to anyone whose will listen. For me they together mark a…… Continue reading On revolutions: two blog posts that stopped me in my tracks

Causes and contexts: Arab Twitter revolutions and the origins of the First World War

Image: A troop train in the First World War (cc) drakegoodman @avschlieffen: Is anyone srsly suggesting trains caused the biggest war of all time? WTF!?! Get over it, you trainspotters. Rail isn’t everything. @billthekaiser: LOL It wasn’t me it was the 11.24 to Gdansk that made me do it. ;) Train timetables caused the biggest…… Continue reading Causes and contexts: Arab Twitter revolutions and the origins of the First World War

Facebook planet

This image has been on my computer desktop and on my mind since I saw it in December. High time I shared it here, really. It’s a data visualisation of 10 million pairs of friends on Facebook and where they live in relationship to one another, created by an intern on Facebook’s data infrastructure engineering…… Continue reading Facebook planet

Platform fixation vs. pattern recognition

(NB: I *know* – I’m late with this. What? I’ve had a break. It was Christmas…) That TIME magazine’s judging panel refused to listen to the same crowd it named person of the year in 2006 is amusing and irritating and predictable at the same time. Instead of Julian Assange, it went for Mark Zuckerberg.…… Continue reading Platform fixation vs. pattern recognition

Three beautiful storytelling approaches from the web

This is a post about three lovely things that are all about using technology to help tell stories in new ways. Storify In private alpha development at the moment, Storify looks like a wonderful way of tying together different bits of your and other people’s content on the web (photos, Tweets, videos) to tell a…… Continue reading Three beautiful storytelling approaches from the web

Facebook vs. websites: sometimes Facebook is better

There’s a kind of web media theologians’ debate that goes on at the moment over whether brands should ditch their websites and move their web presence to Facebook wholesale. So far, I have mostly been an advocate of the teeth-sucking “Ooh, you don’t want to do that…” side of the argument. Reasons being control, wider…… Continue reading Facebook vs. websites: sometimes Facebook is better