An inbox for the mind

This post comprises notes on a work in progress – a drive to reduce tech-based distractions and learn how to use personal technology help me get things done more effectively and with less distraction and stress. There is only one red dot on my smartphone now. It is to remind me to do things with…… Continue reading An inbox for the mind

Neuroscience bringing work culture to its senses

Interesting video from the Financial Times – an interview with Tara Swart, a neuroscientist and coach who teaches at business schools. For those who care to pay attention, neuroscience has been able to back up a great deal of common sense in the workplace, and may even begin to counter the ridiculous long-hours-as-status-sginifier that began in…… Continue reading Neuroscience bringing work culture to its senses

A useful IFTTT recipe for blogging

A really useful piece of advice from Adam Tinworth about blogging is this: bring the inspiration or desire to blog as close as possible to actually blogging. This sounds obvious, but over time all sorts of tools and steps in the process can get added. Consequently, I have an Evernote notebook full of links to…… Continue reading A useful IFTTT recipe for blogging

Cognitive slipstreaming: Thinking is an endurance sport

* Updated * In endurance swimming, I found out this week, you slipstream* just like cyclists do in a peloton. My wife, a sea swimmer, told me that swimming close to the person in front – right up by their kicking legs, off to one side – saves about 30% of the energy. When you…… Continue reading Cognitive slipstreaming: Thinking is an endurance sport

Address powerful goodness

Benjamin Franklin’s day looked like this: Franklin’s structuring of his day like this reminds me of the “daily scaffold” Curtis James talks about in relation to his People Who Do productivity work.  Mine looks a lot messier and more fragmented, including the sleep. I especially like the “address Powerful Goodness” part of the morning. Was that some sort…… Continue reading Address powerful goodness

Tricking yourself out of information overload

According to Oliver Burkeman, informational overload is “suffused with irrationality”:  There are millions of information sources we could, in theory, keep up with, but only a few that we tell ourselves we must – and the distinction’s pretty arbitrary. I try to answer all personal emails, but I don’t worry about answering all personal Twitter…… Continue reading Tricking yourself out of information overload

The big lie of always-on, multi-tasking culture: “We think we’re thinking faster, but actually we’re slowing down.”

“We think we’re thinking faster, but actually we’re slowing down.” Caroline Webb, Partner at McKinsey & Co. Following on from my last post, where I mentioned the brilliant “For Your Information” episode of Peter Day’s BBC series In Business in the context of advertising business models, I’d like to look at the other strand of the…… Continue reading The big lie of always-on, multi-tasking culture: “We think we’re thinking faster, but actually we’re slowing down.”