Opt in tracking – an all too rare experience

I use the Overcast app for podcasts on my iPhone and iPad. It’s really good – straightforward with some useful features like keeping synced between devices and being able to control the speed of playback. Today it asked me if I wanted to “go anonymous”. So simple. So much simpler and less queasy an experience…… Continue reading Opt in tracking – an all too rare experience

Who can see what you are doing on the internet right now?

Yesterday’s cryptoparty was fascinating in so many ways. A two hour-ish session took us through online privacy issues, behaviours and tools. Particularly useful was an interactive diagram from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which campaigns for internet freedom, showing who can see what you are doing with your web browser – from a hacker sitting in…… Continue reading Who can see what you are doing on the internet right now?

Against mass surveillance – what will you do today?

Today is a day of action and protest against mass surveillance by our governments: The Day We Fight Back. Aptly, the first thing in my Twitter stream when I opened my laptop this morning  was the inventor of the Web re-tweeting the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s message… Things move quickly, our lives are busy. Today, though,…… Continue reading Against mass surveillance – what will you do today?

Getting an Autographer

We’ve ordered an Autographer for the Brilliant Noise office. I’m really looking forward to trying it out. Three main things I’m interested in… A new kind of camera: It will be great to experiment with the Autographer in situations where taking photos is difficult. I think especially of running – there are so many interesting…… Continue reading Getting an Autographer

Google Glass and privacy

Jan Chipchase blows away the froth around the Google Glass/privacy conversation:  As a product that is both on-your-face and in-your-face, Glass is set to become a lightning rod for a wider discussion around what constitutes acceptable behavior in public and private spaces. The Glass debate has already started, but these are early days; each new…… Continue reading Google Glass and privacy

Privacy sells?

This advertising billboard in Clerkenwell stopped me in my tracks (and by tracks I mean the sedate progress of my Boris Bike) on Monday. BlackBerry’s encryption of emails is good enough that it upsets those of an authoritarian, prying-into-your-citizens’-communications-persuasion and now they are making a selling point of it. Privacy gets in the way of…… Continue reading Privacy sells?

Mining the where: CIA-funded start-up says 80% of online content contains location information

Last week at Local Social Summit I talked about some of the issues around location and privacy. Especially problematic is people’s inadvertent tagging of their photos with location information – something potentially of interest to crooks, stalkers and others you might not want to know everything about you. Open-source spying is a term which has…… Continue reading Mining the where: CIA-funded start-up says 80% of online content contains location information

Publish first, police second… is that how it works?

The other evening I watched some of the Channel 4 documentary Coppers, in which UK police officers were sharing their disquiet about how people they deal with seem to phone the police rather than deal with their problems themselves. Could it be that there is another contradictory trend, for people to take evidence of crimes…… Continue reading Publish first, police second… is that how it works?