Thinking with machines

From Ray Dalio’s fascinating book, Principles. During those terrible days after 9/ 11, when the whole country was being whipsawed by emotion, or the weeks between September 19 and October 10, 2008, when the Dow fell 3,600 points, there were times I felt like hugging our computers. They kept their cool no matter what. This…… Continue reading Thinking with machines

Threshold concepts

“Threshold concepts” is a term from higher education theory, meaning an idea or a piece of knowledge which, once understood, is transformative – it changes how you look at a subject, what you think is possible. My friend Jim Byford introduced me to the idea of threshold concepts and I’ve been using it ever since…… Continue reading Threshold concepts

Outliner thinking

In this MIT Technology Review article about different writing and blog authoring tools – As We May Type –  Paul Ford describes a tribe I wasn’t aware existed, but once described I knew immediately I was a part of – “outliner people”. Outliners were one of the first writing tools available on computers and they continue to…… Continue reading Outliner thinking

Thinking about Diigo (and some useful tips)

If there is one online tool that I would recommend anyone who thinks for a living, it’s Diigo. The new version of Diigo, launched a month or so ago is absolutely amazing. It’s worth noting the ways you can find value in it I think of these into levels. So I thought I’d write some thoughts…… Continue reading Thinking about Diigo (and some useful tips)

Artefact Cards and liminal states: creative thinking breakthrough tools

There’s a long, long list in my subconscious that I hardly dare look at: Things I Should Have Blogged. The items comprise three types: Important ideas that have taken up residence in my head. For instance, liminal states. Useful tools and ways of working. For instance Artefact Cards. Opinions taking shape. For instance, just because…… Continue reading Artefact Cards and liminal states: creative thinking breakthrough tools

Experts, framing and starting with the end in mind

One thing I have learned from listening to and spending time with experts is that a lot of expertise is not articulated explicitly. Their mental models, short-cuts (heuristics as Kahenman describes them) can be buried deep in their behaviours. They don’t necessarily talk about them or even realise they are happening. They are second nature,…… Continue reading Experts, framing and starting with the end in mind

Cognitive slipstreaming: Thinking is an endurance sport

* Updated * In endurance swimming, I found out this week, you slipstream* just like cyclists do in a peloton. My wife, a sea swimmer, told me that swimming close to the person in front – right up by their kicking legs, off to one side – saves about 30% of the energy. When you…… Continue reading Cognitive slipstreaming: Thinking is an endurance sport

Learning to learn, thinking about thinking

Image: my niece, Boudicca, being amazing, as babies are wont to do… How our brains work is something that I’m reading and thinking about a lot this week, connecting neuroscience with how we work and manage our everyday lives.* A happy moment of serendipity this morning, as I happened to hear The Life Scientific on…… Continue reading Learning to learn, thinking about thinking