Twitter selling that doesn’t feel like spam

The other day I dropped my iPhone 4 on a concrete floor. The glass shattered. My heart sank.

The phone was still working, and a kind soul lent me their hard case, so I then used it to share my gadget woes with the world on Twitter.

Moments later, this popped up.

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My instant reaction was: spam! But then I read it and felt better about it and about my general situation. This was all fixable for £45.

Before I had even begun to think through what I would do next (I had vague words like “insurance” and “warranty” floating about my head, but nothing as substantial as a next-action) the whole solution was in place, and at a reasonable price.

Did I use them in the end? No. One of the many shops advertising “mobile unlocking” and related services in Brighton fixed it for me in a couple of hours for £30, meaning I didn’t need to send my phone away.

Still, a smart use of Twitter, I thought…

Customers in networks: slides and notes from ChangePlayBusinesss

ChangePlayBusiness was an unusual event, to say the least, living up to its promise to be an unconference. About 40 innovators and entrepreneurs gathered at the ICA to play a game about creating businesses, the playing of which included connecting with one another (there were a lot of interesting people) and meeting subject matter experts on everything from financing to marketing (which is where I came in).

My role was to deliver a “masterclass” on understanding and communicating with customers in a “changing economy”. I chose to interpret this as an opportunity to talk about businesses in the age of networks, in the age of complexity.

The slides are here for those (with the push/pull error reversed!) who attended the session:

And these are the links that I promised to post: