Tagged: Social media

Connecting some dots around social, earned and satisfaction

Working through the connections between these things…

Oliver Blanchard says:

If you treat earned media like paid media long enough, you will teach it to act like paid media.

…This is connected with the idea we explored that editors should be in charge of paid digital media (or at least have control of their own budgets) m- treating paid like earned could be a lot more useful than the other way around.

…It’s another angle on what John Willshire discusses in his series of presentations on the idea of “fracking the social web“. The race for Likes and shares and and views leaves depleted culture and relationships in its wake.

…Andy Whitlock says in this deck that creating noise (chasing attention) isn’t always the best approach. Platforms and products are ways of creating long term value, long term relationships, he says.

…This connects with why at Brilliant Noise we’ve talked more about earning advocacy than earning media, or even earning attention. The media’s not the point, the customer is… and they couldn’t give a fig for brands, most of the time.

Which also reminds me of an interesting Twitter conversation yesterday between Mat Morrison, Jon and Professor Byron about brands and satisfaction:

 

Hat tip to Anne McCrossan for pointing me to the Oliver Blanchard article.

B2B social media marketing and the niche of one

Peter Thompson is working in a really interesting book about B2B social media marketing. He’s posted the outline on his blog.

In what he describes as the “most controversial” chapter he proposes a “niche of one” model for social media campaigns to influence a single business decision maker:

creating a dossier of their online habits, to writing blog posts optimised to their personal interests and even creating targeted advertising addressed to just one person. For most companies this would be wastefully over focussed, but for B2B enterprise sales where a single sale can be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, then the time taken to gently influence one person online is time well spent. This is a delicate art and the risk of spooking the prospect is so great that this chapter also covers etiquette, ethics and maintaining anonymity (when appropriate).

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Six brilliant things social businesses and brands do

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Image: an excerpt from Strories, Numbers & Conversations. 

So, this week my company, Brilliant Noise, published its first paper: Stories, Numbers & Conversations: Nokia’s principles for social media.

It may sound strange to say about a strategy paper, but it was a labour of love, and Endless Studios did a great job on making it look beautiful too.

During our work with Nokia, we had the opportunity to revisit some of our favourite case studies of businesses that were using social media, as well as taking a look at some new ones. Continue reading

The only way is social: TOWIE’s production process

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TV production is something that really interests me. Having brushed up against it a few times in recent years, I thought I could learn a little more by listening to the BBC College of Production podcasts.
They have turned out to be a real find, and I highly recommend them to anyone involved in any kind of media work. Even if you don’t work with TV, hearing about other people’s creative processes are really useful.

One episode on “constructed reality” programmes was particularly interesting. The bit where Tony Wood, who created The Only Way is Essex  (TOWIE to its fans) shares his production approach with his enthralled peers reveals how groundbreaking this show has been. Continue reading

Smells like social media meaning

Falsche freunde. False friends. You hear a phrase that sounds like one you already know and misinterpret it…

As I’ve said before this happens all the time with the word “networks”. We’re so used to hearing it, prefaced by social-, computer-, broadcast, etc. that we think we know what it means. Continue reading

The fog of revolution: social media trends 2006 & 2012

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Thanks to the brevity and immediacy of Twitter I have already Tweeted saying everyone needs to read the sources of inspiration for this post. So you’ll forgive me for opening with some tangentilish thoughts…

Or maybe you won’t.

One of my favourite observations about change and the web is what I call “the fog of revolution”, a phrase that became very popular last year in a different context. When you’re in the middle of a revolution it is very hard to know what’s going on, not least when there are so many voices close by telling you exactly what is going on, and generally being very wrong. Continue reading

Online reputation management for artists – notes and slides from talk at Brighton Digital Festival

These are the notes and my presentation slides that will kick things off at this evening’s discussion evening at the Fabrica gallery in Brighton. This is the first in a series of events called Brave New World – A New Arts Landscape. is part of the Brighton Digital Festival, which continues until September 24th.

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Privacy sells?

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This advertising billboard in Clerkenwell stopped me in my tracks (and by tracks I mean the sedate progress of my Boris Bike) on Monday.

BlackBerry’s encryption of emails is good enough that it upsets those of an authoritarian, prying-into-your-citizens’-communications-persuasion and now they are making a selling point of it.

Privacy gets in the way of advertising business models as well as the secret police, which is why managing your privacy settings on services from your browser to Facebook is often unnecessarily complicated. It may not be a conspiracy to stop you from guarding your data, but there isn’t a perceived incentive to make this stuff really useful for the networks.

Or for anyone else. Apart from Ad Blocker web browser extensions and a clutch of very geeky tools used by activists and cautious geeks, there aren’t mass market tools and services to help people control how their data is used, how their personal becomes public…

Google’s recognised this, sort of… At least Paul Adams did in his masterpiece of a research paper on social networks - The Real Life Social Network – at Google (I note he is now at Facebook). Then we thought we’d see Google Circles, an social network designed to help with this managing of your content and conversations. But then we didn’t.

Thing is, privacy – what we want from it, what we actually mean by it, etc. – is complicated. As I discussed at Local Social Summit last year, privacy can mean all sorts of things. Privacy is proxy issue for fears and doubts about life with the web and with technology more broadly.

Anyway, back to the BlackBerry ad. I wonder if this sells phones. I wonder if privacy will sell other stuff too. I wonder if – as Alan Patrick – privacy itself is something that will be sold (as a service, a premium package, whatever…).